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Bills' Reed out of hospital after kidney injury

Buffalo Bills receiver Josh Reed was released from the hospital Nov. 7, two days after suffering a bruised kidney.

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. (Nov. 7, 2006) -- Buffalo Bills receiver Josh Reed was released from the hospital Nov. 7, two days after suffering a bruised kidney.

The Bills didn't update Reed's condition or say whether he'll play Nov. 12 in Buffalo's game at Indianapolis. Coach Dick Jauron was scheduled to update Reed's status Nov. 8 when the team returns to practice.

Reed was hurt in the second quarter of Buffalo's 24-10 win over Green Bay on Nov. 5, when he was tackled after making a 6-yard catch. Reed returned to the field later in the quarter, but was diagnosed with a bruised kidney during halftime.

He was taken to a hospital during the game and spent a second night under observation as a precaution.

Starting running back Willis McGahee was also injured in the game when he broke a rib early in the first quarter. McGahee's status is also uncertain for this weekend, although Jauron has yet to rule him out.

Reed, Buffalo's second-round pick in the 2002 draft, has been used as a slot third-down receiver this season. He ranks third on the team with 23 catches and second with 229 yards, and has also scored one touchdown.

Reed's injury could further deplete a receiving corps that's already missing reserve Sam Aiken, who was sidelined Nov. 5 with a hamstring injury.

If Reed and Aiken are both out, backups Roscoe Parrish and Andre' Davis would move up to fill their spots behind starters Lee Evans and Peerless Price.

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