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Williams, Dolphins work out 'quiet and easy' extension through 2010

MIAMI -- Ricky Williams wants to stick around the NFL just a little longer.

Williams signed a one-year contract extension that could keep him with the Miami Dolphins through 2010, according to salary information posted on the NFL Players Association Web site on Tuesday. The 32-year-old running back is scheduled to earn a base salary of $3.4 million this season and $4.35 million in 2010.

Williams told The Miami Herald that he talked to Dolphins vice president of football operations Bill Parcells and worked out an agreement that was "quiet and easy" -- and without an agent. Williams also hinted to The Herald that he will retire after the 2010 season.

Williams, the 1998 Heisman Trophy winner and 2002 NFL rushing champion, has rejuvenated his career in Miami and became a solid running back alongside Ronnie Brown last season. All that hardly seemed possible just five years ago, when Williams shocked the NFL by retiring from football. He also is a five-time offender of the league's substance-abuse policy.

Williams returned in 2007, but that stint didn't last long. He gained just 15 yards on six carries before he fumbled, was stepped on and tore his chest muscle during a game against the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Last season, Williams again returned and similarly negotiated his own contract extension, admitting that he upset then-agent Leigh Steinberg.

Miami's new Parcells-led regime has been nothing but supportive of Williams.

"There's very strong feelings about Ricky and what he's done for us -- and certainly for me -- since he's been here," Dolphins coach Tony Sparano told The Miami Herald on Tuesday night. "From what he brings from a work-ethic standpoint, as a pro in the meeting rooms, he's a good ambassador of our message to the younger players."

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