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Parcells, Dolphins hire Ireland as new GM

The Miami Dolphins named Jeff Ireland as their new general manager, the team announced Wednesday. Ireland joins the Dolphins after a seven-year stint with the Dallas Cowboys, where he spent the past three as the team's Vice President of College and Pro Scouting.

"I am excited about joining the Dolphins as their general manager," Ireland said. "I know the great tradition of the team, and in my mind they are one of the flagship franchises in the NFL. They have a great owner in Wayne Huizenga, who I know is committed to making the Dolphins into winners once again. I am looking forward to working with him and everyone else in Miami to achieve that goal.

"I also want to thank Jerry Jones and the Dallas Cowboys organization. I enjoyed my tenure with the team, and I would not be where I am today without the help of so many people there."

Prior to being elevated to his most recent role with the Cowboys in 2005, Ireland had served as national scout with Dallas since 2001, during which time he evaluated the top collegiate talent in the country. In his four years in that post, the Cowboys drafted four Pro Bowl performers in safety Roy Williams, center Andre Gurode, cornerback Terence Newman and tight end Jason Witten.

Ireland got his start in the NFL as a scout with the Kansas City Chiefs, where he spent the 1997-2000 seasons. He also was a scout for the National Football Scouting combine from 1994-96.

Before becoming an NFL scout, Ireland coached the special teams at the University of North Texas from 1992-93. This followed his playing career at Baylor University, where he was a kicker from 1988-91.

A native of Abilene, Texas, Ireland is the stepson of former Kansas City Chiefs standout linebacker/center E.J. Holub and the grandson of former Philadelphia Eagles player and longtime Chicago Bears personnel man Jim Parmer.

After 7-9 finish, Lions fire offensive coordinator Mike Martz

DETROIT -- The Detroit Lions reportedly fired Mike Martz on Wednesday, ending his fractious two years as the team's offensive coordinator.

Martz will be replaced by Jim Colletto, who will retain his position as offensive line coach while calling plays. Receivers coach Kippy Brown will serve as co-coordinator, the Detroit Free Press, Booth Newspapers and ESPN.com reported and NFL Network's Adam Schefter confirmed.

A message seeking comment was left Wednesday with Martz's agent, Bob LaMonte. The Lions had no comment on the reports, a team spokesman said.

Martz confirmed his firing to the Free Press.

"We fell short of what we wanted to do offensively, and I regret that," he told the newspaper.

The Lions finished 7-9 this season after a 6-2 start.

During two losing seasons in Detroit, Martz was unable to replicate the success he had during the "Greatest Show on Turf" years in St. Louis.

Martz coached the Rams from 2000-2005, including a Super Bowl loss in 2001. He used the same offense in Detroit, but it didn't translate into many wins for the Lions and head coach Rod Marinelli.

The Rams fired Martz on Jan. 2, 2006, the day after St. Louis finished 6-10. He sat out the last 11 games recovering from endocarditis, a bacterial infection of a heart valve.

Martz led St. Louis to the playoffs in four of his five full seasons, and helped the franchise win Super Bowl XXXIV as offensive coordinator. The Rams went 51-29 in the regular season and 54-33 overall during his five full seasons as head coach.

His first NFL job was with the Los Angeles Rams as an offensive assistant in 1992-93, then was quarterbacks coach in 1994. He was wide receivers coach in 1995-96 after the franchise moved to St. Louis, and was quarterbacks coach for the Washington Redskins in 1997-98.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report

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