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Patriots provide inside look at Super Bowl XXXIX

If you have Three Games to Glory II, then you know the drill. You heard David Givens, Deion Branch and Mike Vrabel give their narration of Super Bowl XXXVIII on last year's Patriots-produced championship DVD. So with Three Games to Glory III available for pre-order on Patriots.com and ready to hit the shelves before April's NFL Draft, Ted Johnson, Rosevelt Colvin and Matt Light took their turns in front of the TV screen with microphones in their faces as they watched and analyzed New England's Super Bowl XXXIX win over the Eagles.

"It's the first time I've seen it since we played," Johnson acknowledged. "It was fun to watch the game and see the plays our guys made in critical situations and see what the other team did to make mistakes to kind of help us secure the game."

One such mistake Johnson and the rest of the football world witnessed was Philly's clock management in the final five minutes of the Super Bowl when, while trailing by 10, the Eagles failed to use their hurry-up offense in a time where some Eagles players claimed that quarterback Donovan McNabb was having difficulty catching his breath and may have been dry heaving.

"Sitting here watching it, you're still kind of amazed there wasn't more of a sense of urgency," Johnson said. "There was nothing on tape that I could see physically where [McNabb] had any limitations. I don't know and I don't know if we'll ever know how he was really feeling. But you can't help but sit here and wonder why they weren't moving the ball faster."

Johnson said he was amazed at Philly's approach during the game as the clock ticked down. "I don't know if it's being in this system for so long and knowing automatically what is needed in each situation, but when you're down two scores, it's a hurry-up situation all the way. They were certainly in no hurry-up mode."

Neither was the trio of Patriots who sat back and enjoyed breaking down Super Bowl XXXIX for Three Games to Glory III.

"This was cool," Colvin said. "We won so it gave you an opportunity to reflect, especially sitting here with these two guys. Anytime you are in a room with Matt Light, you have to bounce off him because he's so colorful in everything he does. It was a good time to sit back and watch everything that went on. I was proud to be out there and happy to be a part of it."

When Light's in the room, there is always good-natured ribbing," Johnson added, "and Rosey too. They had a nice synergy working together and I was the voice of reason. I kept things on track."

Colvin, for his part, is looking toward a future in journalism, perhaps as an analyst. "I think that's what I'm going to do," the Patriots outside linebacker said. "I think I'm going to try to get a couple of internships either at a newspaper, a radio station or a TV station. I don't have a problem speaking in front of people and I'm comfortable in front of crowds. He even sings. Although after belting out a couple of chords from Playhouse Disney's Jo-Jo's Circus cartoon, he cut himself off and refused to sing anymore, adding only that his mother is a music teacher and that he and Light, who were college teammates at Purdue, sometimes sing duets before practice.

But his practice as a television analyst included watching himself make a big play in Super Bowl XXXIX, when he stuffed running back Brian Westbrook for a 6-yard loss.

"There were some different angles [on the video] that I didn't get to see in the game, especially the play I had the opportunity to make. That was great that they put that on there. I appreciate that. I'm sure the fans will enjoy the DVD."

Patriots Football Weekly publisher and editor-in-chief Fred Kirsch directed the segment of Three Games to Glory III, which can be pre-ordered on Patriots.com or purchased at the Patriots Pro Shop before the NFL Draft, which will take place April 23 and 24. Colvin even analyzed Kirsch's performance as well as that of the entire organization.

"Fred was good," Colvin said. "But everyone around here is pretty good at what they do, including the football team. The organization, from top to bottom, has a lot of classy people. Even you guys."

Oh Rosey, flattery will get you everywhere.

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