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Ask PFW, Part II: Seymour and more

Hey guys, I love what you do, and I guess you are the ones to best answer my question. In regard to Richard Seymour, with this being the final year of his contract, when it then expires, can he still be franchise tagged? If his contract expires, how can the Raiders tag him? What I guess I am saying is, if he is no longer under contract to the Raiders, what right does a team have to force a player to stay if they don't control his rights? Or do they? I always thought if there was no contract there is no control of the player. Thanks.Al Mazzilli

According to the current NFL Collective Bargaining Agreement, teams can tag a player who would otherwise hit the free agent market (unrestricted as well as restricted) in an upcoming offseason. The rules state that clubs have an approximately two-week window during which they are allowed to apply the franchise tag to players. That window opens about three weeks prior to the start of the new league year (typically around the beginning of March) and closes roughly one week before the new league year commences. This is significant because most NFL contracts end at the start of the new league year. So, as I understand the wording of it, if the Raiders wanted to slap Seymour with their franchise tag at the end of this season, they would be doing so while he is still technically under contract with Oakland.
Erik Scalavino

I am curious what would happen if there is a lockout for the whole 2011 season and there is no draft (or would a draft be held no matter what?). would the Patriots lose the compensation they received from the Raiders in the Seymour trade?
Richard Knisley

Good question. We're in uncharted waters, to a certain extent, with this particular labor situation. If there is a lockout, it's unclear when such an action would begin. But let's say there is no 2011 NFL Draft … my guess is the first-rounder would carry over to the next draft. I really don't want to speculate any further about something so far in advance, though, because so much can and probably will change between now and then.
Erik Scalavino

**[

Hey guys, I love what you do, and I guess you are the ones to best answer my question. In regard to Richard Seymour, with this being the final year of his contract, when it then expires, can he still be franchise tagged? If his contract expires, how can the Raiders tag him? What I guess I am saying is, if he is no longer under contract to the Raiders, what right does a team have to force a player to stay if they don't control his rights? Or do they? I always thought if there was no contract there is no control of the player. Thanks.Al Mazzilli

According to the current NFL Collective Bargaining Agreement, teams can tag a player who would otherwise hit the free agent market (unrestricted as well as restricted) in an upcoming offseason. The rules state that clubs have an approximately two-week window during which they are allowed to apply the franchise tag to players. That window opens about three weeks prior to the start of the new league year (typically around the beginning of March) and closes roughly one week before the new league year commences. This is significant because most NFL contracts end at the start of the new league year. So, as I understand the wording of it, if the Raiders wanted to slap Seymour with their franchise tag at the end of this season, they would be doing so while he is still technically under contract with Oakland.
Erik Scalavino

I am curious what would happen if there is a lockout for the whole 2011 season and there is no draft (or would a draft be held no matter what?). would the Patriots lose the compensation they received from the Raiders in the Seymour trade?
Richard Knisley

Good question. We're in uncharted waters, to a certain extent, with this particular labor situation. If there is a lockout, it's unclear when such an action would begin. But let's say there is no 2011 NFL Draft … my guess is the first-rounder would carry over to the next draft. I really don't want to speculate any further about something so far in advance, though, because so much can and probably will change between now and then.
Erik Scalavino

**[

pats_1960_helmet.jpg

]()I have a memory of the first Patriots helmet logo, and it was not Pat Patriot. Wasn't the first helmet logo a blue tri-corn hat? Also, I believe the jersey design was different. This current "throwback" helmet/jersey is not the original design.**
Jack Marshall

You're correct, Jack. The first season of Patriots football (1960) featured a blue tri-corn with red numbers below it. Thereafter, the organization went with the lovable Pat Patriot design. So, yeah, the entire throwback uniform ensemble isn't quite an exact replica, but it still looks cool, I think.
Erik Scalavino

Did I miss the memo from Mr. Kraft and the NFL that the NEW ENGLAND Patriots have changed their name to the Boston Patriots? Why is this site calling our NEW ENGLAND Patriots the Boston Patriots? I was under the impression the throwback jerseys were to honor the AFL. Do we need to be calling our 2009 team the Boston Patriots? I really don't like it one bit.
Todd Huelsman

Whoa! Todd, buddy … take a deep breath. No need to get all riled up. It's a purely ceremonial move. There's been no official name change. The NFL is simply honoring the original eight American Football League franchises by calling the current teams by their original names when they play Legacy Games against other original AFL teams. So, for instance, when the Tennessee Titans come to town next month, they'll be referred to as the Houston Oilers and wear their old powder blue uniforms and oil derrick helmets. The Jets will be called the Titans of New York when they play their Legacy Game against the Tennessee Titans/Houston Oilers later this month, and get this – when the Dallas Cowboys play the Kansas City Chiefs on October 11, Dallas will be playing Dallas, because the Chiefs were first known as the Dallas Texans. So, just calm down, OK, Todd. You don't want to be known as the guy who takes all the fun out of a wonderful effort by the NFL to honor its history.
Erik Scalavino

pats_1960_helmet.jpg

]()I have a memory of the first Patriots helmet logo, and it was not Pat Patriot. Wasn't the first helmet logo a blue tri-corn hat? Also, I believe the jersey design was different. This current "throwback" helmet/jersey is not the original design.**
Jack Marshall

You're correct, Jack. The first season of Patriots football (1960) featured a blue tri-corn with red numbers below it. Thereafter, the organization went with the lovable Pat Patriot design. So, yeah, the entire throwback uniform ensemble isn't quite an exact replica, but it still looks cool, I think.
Erik Scalavino

Did I miss the memo from Mr. Kraft and the NFL that the NEW ENGLAND Patriots have changed their name to the Boston Patriots? Why is this site calling our NEW ENGLAND Patriots the Boston Patriots? I was under the impression the throwback jerseys were to honor the AFL. Do we need to be calling our 2009 team the Boston Patriots? I really don't like it one bit.
Todd Huelsman

Whoa! Todd, buddy … take a deep breath. No need to get all riled up. It's a purely ceremonial move. There's been no official name change. The NFL is simply honoring the original eight American Football League franchises by calling the current teams by their original names when they play Legacy Games against other original AFL teams. So, for instance, when the Tennessee Titans come to town next month, they'll be referred to as the Houston Oilers and wear their old powder blue uniforms and oil derrick helmets. The Jets will be called the Titans of New York when they play their Legacy Game against the Tennessee Titans/Houston Oilers later this month, and get this – when the Dallas Cowboys play the Kansas City Chiefs on October 11, Dallas will be playing Dallas, because the Chiefs were first known as the Dallas Texans. So, just calm down, OK, Todd. You don't want to be known as the guy who takes all the fun out of a wonderful effort by the NFL to honor its history.
Erik Scalavino

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